Wednesday, 30 January 2013

Mathew Weld 1675

In the name of God Amen the twentieth day of January in the five and twentieth year of the reign of our sovereign lord king, Charles the second, 1673, I, Mathew Weld of Fen Ditton in the county of Cambridge, Gent, being in perfect health and of a sound memory, thanks be given to God, and avoiding further preamble which is rather of course than necessity, do make this my last will and testament in form following: Imprimis: I give and bequeath unto Mrs Jane Weld, my truly loving and virtuous wife, all my messuages, lands, tenements, pastures, meadows and woods both free and copyhold with their and every of their rights, members and appurtenances whatsoever situate, lying and being in Gissing in Norfolk to have and to hold the said messuages, lands, tenements, pastures, meadows and woods both free and copyhold to the said Mrs Jane Weld and her assigns for and during the term of her natural life upon condition that she shall keep the said houses, barns, stables and other the edifices in rentable repair and from and after her decease I give the same messuages, lands, tenements, pastures, meadows and woods with their and every of their appurtenances unto my two brothers, Wickstead Weld, Esq., and John Weld, their heirs and assigns to be equally divided between them to have and to hold to the said Wickstead and John their heirs and assigns forever, the aforementioned premises immediately from and after the death of my said wife but my will and meaning is that if my wife shall chance to be with child at the time of my death and that after the child shall be born and live to the age of one and twenty years then the devise above to my two brothers, Wickstead and John shall be void and of no effect and that all my estate aforesaid shall go to the said child and it’s heirs forever from and after the death of my said wife. Item: I give unto my brother Wickstead Weld all my Law books or Latin Books whatsoever. Item: I give unto my brother Martin all my apparel linen and woollen. Item: I give to my brother John forty shillings to buy him a ring to be paid him within a quarter of a year after my decease. Item: I give unto the poor of the town of Fen Ditton twenty shillings to be distributed amongst them by the overseers of the said town within one month after my decease. Item: I give to the poor of Gissing in Norfolk forty shillings to be paid to the overseers of the said town within a quarter of a year after my decease to be by them distributed amongst the said poor. All the rest of my goods and chattels, debts and household stuff whatsoever, my debts and funeral charges being first defrayed, I give and dispose of them to my said wife, Mrs Jane Weld, whom I do make and ordain sole executrix of this my last will and testament herein revoking all other and former wills by me heretofore made. I formally surrender my copyhold land at Gissing into the hands of the lord of the manor by the hands of Mr Edmund Clarke, his steward, to the use of my will and paid him for the entry thereof. In witness thereof etc...seven and twentieth day of September 1674.

Wickstead Weld 1700

This is the last will and testament of me, Wicksted Weld, of Moulton in the county of Suffolk, Esquire. And first whereas a great part of my estate is already settled upon the marriage of my daughter Taylor I do, by this my will, confirm the said settlement in all things and do hereby declare my will to be that whatsoever is in the said settlement contained and intended to be thereby settled shall go, ensue and be according to the several limitations and declarations concerning the same respectively therein mentioned. And as concerning the same respectively therein mentioned and as concerning my farm at Fordham, in the county of Cambridge holden by lease of Trinity Hall in Cambridge for a term of years not yet expired (the said farm not being comprised in the foresaid settlement) I do hereby give unto my dear wife and Dudley Bradbury of Moulton aforesaid, clerk, and to Thomas Seargant of Ashley in the county of Cambridge, clerk, and the survivors and survivor of them and the executors and administrators of such survivor. And as for and concerning all that the parsonage or rectory I’m propriate of Fordham aforesaid and all tithes of what nature soever to the same belonging (all which I now hold of the Bishop of Ely and have them a freehold and distendible estate determinable upon lives) and all other my estate whatsoever holden of the said Bishop I do here by give and devise the same and all my estate, right, title and interest therein whatsoever unto my said loving wife and the said Dudley Bradbury and Thomas Seargant and the survivor and survivors of them and the heirs and assigns of such survivor, all which freehold and leasehold premises holden of the said college of Trinity Hall and the Bishop of Ely are yet nevertheless hereby given and demised as aforesaid only to the intent and purposes and upon trust in the first place to pay and discharge all the several rents and to perform all the several covenants contained in the several and respective leases of the premises according to the time and meaning thereof on the part or parts of the respective lessees and tenants of the same to be paid, kept and performed and in the next place of the other part of the rents, issues and profits thereof to raise all such sums of money as from time to time shall be necessary and sufficient for the paying and discharging the several fines and all charges for the renewing and filling up all the several leases for such times and terms of twenty and one years for three lives as mu trustees can or may obtain of the several and respective premises and to apply the said money so raised for the paying and discharging of the same, it being my will and desire that my said freehold and leasehold farms should have continuance and not be worn out and the tenancies thereof be lost for want of renewal. And it is my will and desire that the said estates and leases be respectively renewed in and at such convenient times and seasons as have been usual and accustomed in such cases before the respective interest therein be too far spent and that the respective interest in such renewed estates and leases be vested and continued in my said trustees in such manner and upon such limitations as is hereinbefore and shall be hereafter declared of and concerning the present interest of the same premises respectively and to the intent and upon this further trust that my trustees shall likewise out of the rents , issues and profits of the same premises reimburse themselves and every of them all their necessary expenses, costs, charges and damages occasioned for or by reason of the trust hereby committed to and reposed in them and shall in the next place out of the said rents and profits pay and allow unto my brother, John Weld, of London, the yearly sum of twenty pounds during the term of his natural life by four quarterly even or equal portions and payable at the four most usual feasts or quarter days in each year, the first payment to be made upon the first quarter day which shall be at the distance of three months at least after my decease which annuity I will shall be paid to him only upon condition hereafter mentioned and declared (that is to say) if he, the said John Weld, my brother shall indemnify and save harmless my trustees and executors of this my last will and testament and give them such security as shall satisfy them and be thought sufficient to indemnify and save them harmless from all bonds and engagements in which I have been formerly become bound for him, my said brother, and upon trust to pay and dispose of the rest of the rents, issues and profits of the same premises to my son, Wickstead Weld, during the term of his natural life to and for his own use and behoof and from and after his decease for the payment of ten pounds per annum unto my said son, Wickstead’s, wife that now is, during her widowhood payable at four equal portions at the four must usual quarter days of the year and in trust for the maintenance and education of all such legitimate children of him, the said Wickstead Weld, as he shall leave at the time of his death until the eldest son of him, the Wickstead, lawfully begotten, if shall leave any, shall attain to his age of one and twenty years, which children I desire may be brought up by the care and direction of my said trustees and such an allowance assigned for their education as they, my said trustees, in their discretion shall think fit and what shall remain of the said rents and profits during the minority of the eldest son of my said son, Wickstead, my will is shall be equally disposed of and laid out amongst the other children of him, my said son, Wickstead, for portions for the said children and when the eldest son of my said son, Wickstead, shall attain his age of one and twenty years in trust for such son his heirs, executors or administrators. All which rents and profits arising out of the premises I give for the use of my said son, Wickstead, and the legitimate heirs of his body upon condition only that he, my said son, and his children after him shall be obliged to perform all the covenants, pay and allow all manner of reserved rents out of the premises, maintain, keep and uphold in good and sufficient repair the chancel belonging to the parish church of Fordham aforesaid and likewise the houses, barns, stables, dovehouse and all other edifices as thereunto belonging and also all other necessary charges whatsoever which shall happen to my said trustees or their executors or administrators in managing and performing of the said trust committed and reposed in them and that my said son, Wickstead, and his heirs shall indemnify and save harmless the said trustees and their executors from all manner of suits, charges or troubles which shall or may fall upon them hereafter by reason of the said trust or executorship committed to them. And also upon condition that he, my said son Wickstead Weld, shall within three months after my decease give up all his right and title to a certain estate lately by me purchased of Doctor Buckenham in Moulton aforesaid containing by estimation one hundred and fifty acres be the same more or less with two cottages being part of the said purchase; all which premise I purchased of Dr Buckenham aforesaid I give and bequeath to my grandchild, Alexander Horton, his heirs, executors, administrators and assigns during the term of years in the said estate to me by lease granted not yet expired; all which premises I give and bequeath to my said grandchild, Alexander Horton, upon condition that he, the said Alexander Horton, do take the same in lieu of a farm at Dunstall Green in the parish of Dalham in the county of Suffolk, which said farm was intended to be settled upon my daughter, the mother of the said Alexander Horton, upon her marriage. And my further will and meaning is that my said son, Wickstead Weld, shall have no benefit hereinbefore by this my will intended to him unless he shall suffer and permit my said grandchild, Alexander Horton, and his heirs quietly and peaceably at all times to have, hold and possess and enjoy all that estate aforesaid lately by me purchased of Doctor Buckenham which I sometime since settled upon or leased unto my said son, Wickstead, and shall upon request to him made by good assurance in the law likewise convey over and assure unto my said grandchild, his heirs and assigns the said estate so settled upon or leased to him as aforesaid and in case he shall give any disturbance or interruption unto my said grandchild, his heirs or assigns in the enjoyment of the same or shall not upon request as aforesaid make such conveyance and assurance as aforesaid I do then by this my will give and devise all benefit and advantage herein before intended, mentioned and expressed to or toward my said son unto my said grandchild, Alexander Horton, and his assigns anything herein before mentioned to the contrary notwithstanding but upon condition that he, the said Alexander Horton, my grandchild, shall observe, perform and keep all the said covenants and be tied by the same conditions as aforesaid and shall from time to time and all times indemnify and save harmless my trustees and executors as above mentioned. And as concerning my farm at Moulton which I hold by lease of Trinity Hall aforesaid for a term of years not yet expired I give the profits of the said farm to my dear wife for the term of one and twenty years if she live so long, she conveying the lease in due time and before its expiration, paying the rents, performing the covenants and keeping up the houses, barns, stables and other edifices thereunto belonging in good and sufficient repairs and after the said term of years or the decease of my wife I bequeath the said farm to the trustees aforesaid and the survivors and survivor of them, the heirs and executors of such survivor for the use of my said son, Wickstead Weld, and his children after him, to be enjoyed by him and them as before expressed and limited in the settlement of my farms at Fordham aforesaid. Also I give my dear daughter, Mary Taylor, the wife of Thomas Taylor, Esq., if she happen to survive and outlive her husband that now is, the sum of two hundred pounds to be paid or served to her for her use within six months after the decease of her husband, the said Thomas Taylor, Esq.; also all my plate, linen, bedding and household stuff within doors. It is my will and I do hereby appoint that my wife shall have the use and wearing of the same during the term of her natural life without being accountable for anything that shall be worn out or decayed by use and after her decease I do give to my daughter Taylor, if she happen to be a widow, my silver tea pot, my silver server, two silver plates and one silver tankard which was my wife’s before marriage. And to my son, Wickstead Weld, I give my great silver tankard and six silver spoons commonly called apostle spoons. And to my grandson, Alexander Horton, I give one silver tankard. The rest of my plate and goods within doors I do give and devise one moiety or half part of the same unto my son, Wickstead Weld, and the other moiety of half part I do give and devise to my daughter Taylor if she happen to be a widow and my grandson, Alexander Horton, to be equally divided between them. And my will is that my wife do as soon as conveniently may be after my decease make a true inventory or particular of the said plate, linen, bedding and household stuff and deliver one copy thereof to my son, Wickstead, and another copy thereof to my daughter Taylor and a third copy thereof to my grandson, Alexander Horton. And whereas I hold a cottage in Moulton aforesaid called Fletchers with two acres of land thereunto belonging from the aforesaid college of Trinity Hall in Cambridge I do give to my servant, George Browne, the said cottage with the land thereunto belonging for the term of fourteen years after my decease he paying the rent and performing the covenants reserved and required in the lease from the said college. And for and concerning the rest of my personal estate I do hereby will and bequeath unto my son, Wickstead Weld, four cows now in his possession, my riding nag and akll my books with the best of my wearing clothes, linen and woollen. And as for the rest of my stocks I will that the same, as soon as may be after my decease, be converted into money by my executors hereafter named and that they do there out, in the first place, satisfy my funeral and all my just debts and the legacies hereafter given and bequeathed and that my said executors and the survivors and survivor of them and the executors and administrators of such survivor do and shall from to time employ and dispose of the residue of my said personal estate out at interest upon security to be taken in their name or the names of the survivors or survivor of them or the executors or administrators of such survivor the remaining part of which after my debts and legacies are discharged I will and appoint shall be divided one moiety or half part thereof among the younger children of my son, Wickstead, if he leaves more than one, and the other moiety to be divided between the children of my daughter Taylor and my grandchild, Alexander Horton. And in case my son, Wickstead, dies without children or have but one then I bequeath the said moiety or half part to be divided between my nephew, John Weld, and my niece, Rebeccah Oates, son and daughter to my brother, John Weld, of London, provided. Usual executor’s indemnity clause. And as concerning other legacies by me intended I do hereby give and bequeath to each of my brother, John Weld’s, five children now living as shall happen to survive me the sum of five pounds upon condition only that they, together with their father, shall indemnify and save harmless my executors and give them such security as shall be thought sufficient to indemnify them from all bonds and engagements in which I have been formerly become bound for him, my said brother, their father. Also I give to my servant, George Browne, the sum of forty pounds to be paid him within six months after my decease in consideration as well as of his faithful service as for what arrearages of wages as shall then happen to be due to him. Also I give to my kinswoman, Margaret Palmer, widow, the sum of forty shillings. Also to my sister, Amy Dayrell, widow, the sum of twenty shillings. Also to Jane Page of Moulton, widow, the sum of forty shillings. Also to the poor of the parish of Moulton aforesaid the sum of thirty shillings and to the poor of the parish of Fordham aforesaid the sum of fifty shillings to be disposed of in each parish at the discretion of my executors. Also I give to my dear wife my chariot and two coach horses with coach harness for two horses. Also to my cousin, Heigham Pern of Brinkley, and to his son and daughter, if they survive me, to each ten shillings to buy them rings. Also I order my executors to lay out five pounds for mourning for my son, Wickstead Weld, to be in readiness for him to put on at my burial and to pay him in part of the rents accruing and growing out of the farms of Fordham the sum of twenty pounds within three months after my decease. Also I give to my son in law, Thomas Taylor, Esq., the sum of forty shillings. Also I give to my son in law, Hugh Horton, Esq., the sum of forty shillings. Also to his wife that now is the sum of twenty shillings and to each of his children by this wife alive at the time of my decease the sum of ten shillings. Also I give to Dudley Bradley aforesaid of Moulton in the county of Suffolk, clerk, the sum of forty shillings. Also I give to Thomas Stavancer of Ashley in the county of Cambridge, clerk, the sum of three pounds. And I do hereby nominate and appoint my dearly beloved wife and Dudley Bradbury aforesaid and Thomas Stavancer aforesaid executors of this my last will and testament etc... Also I do give my loving kinsman, Joseph Weld of Bury St Edmunds in the county of Suffolk, Esq., the sum of forty shillings. Also to John Worthington late fellow of St Peters College in Cambridge the sum of twenty shillings. And I desire and request the said Joseph Weld, Esq., and the said John Worthington, gentleman, to be supervisors of this my last will and testament and that they would be aiding and assisting to my executors and trustees before mentioned in witness whereof etc... this eighteenth day of July in the year of our Lord God one thousand six hundred ninety nine.

Mathew Weld's will 1652

In the name of God Amen. I, Mathew Weld, of Braconash in the county of Norfolk, Gentleman, being in good health of body and perfect memory, thanks be unto almighty God, this twelfth day of October in the year of our Lord God one thousand and six hundred forty and nine considering the frailty and uncertainty of all flesh and the [illegible] and daily experience of man's mortality and trust that in fear (?) of sickness through pain so and in consideration thereunto [illegible] necessary and convenient cannot be with judgement and consideration so provided for but that many doubts will or may arise that may intend not only to the great prejudice of the true intent and meaning of him who in his lifetime devises and devised his estate amongst his friends but many times and for the most part such contention and uncharitable quarrels removed and [illegible] thereby that that seldom or never but create consumption of money expended in suits of law and [illegible] and they are or do become a [illegible] for [illegible] or true hatred from & as they were before I which respectably wish and entreat all my friends and children (my wife being departed out of this natural life) that hereby shall any way be interested or benefited by any love I bear them that especially they will respect me and my care (?) that I have thereto of and in all doubt that shall or may arise or grow by any devise in my will that every of them would be of so tractable inclination to embrace the peace and love one of another and my good intent and [illegible] and that rather they will and [illegible] to uphold than to be any hindrance [illegible] the other and so such person not interested to the question or matter of difference to end and determine the same and [illegible] my intent and meaning and may with reason be and go or be made of. And now first and principally with a most cheerful heart I [illegible] up and give unto the almighty God, my maker and whose name be blessed forever, my soul and spirit which he, of his fatherly goodness, hath given me, nothing doubting but by a true and most and most wise faith in Christ Jesus and not for any merits or worthiness in myself who I confess to be a most vile and [illegible] sinner and as and for him [illegible] sake and love are [illegible] unto me by the shedding forth of his most precious blood for [illegible] will receive the same into his hand and place it in the [illegible] and company of his heavenly saints and children. And concerning my body in that obedience (?) that I owe I do likewise most willingly and freely give it over, commending it to the earth from which it had, by the power of God's provision and [illegible] first issue and being and the same to be buried in the church or chancel of Braconash or in Tasburgh where my wife and eldest son, Mathew, are interred or elsewhere at the discretion of my executor or executors likewise assuring myself according to the article of my faith that at the great day of the general resurrection when all shall appear before the judgement seat of God and Christ I shall receive the same again by his almighty power whereby he is able to subdue all things to himself and that with no other but [illegible] voice those eyes I shall see and behold the most gracious face of my most merciful redeemer not in my weak body as it is now subject to mortality and corruption but in a body perfect, strong, incorruptible, immortal and in all points fit and united to my soul and like unto the glorious body of my Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. And as concerning my worldly and temporal blessings which God of his goodness hath blessed and enriched me withall amongst which this not the least manner my children and grandchildren who are, I make not any the least doubt, because God hath said and promised it if they depend upon and place their care and trust upon and diligently serve Him that He will not only become their patron and defender but a father to the fatherless and orphaned yet [illegible] it hath been his good pleasure to make no unworthy steward of a good portion of this worldly substance and houses, lands, goods, chattels, cattles and like transitory possessions part whereof by portion with my late wife, deceased, together with our endeavours but yet not for but by the only blessings of God the same such [illegible] therefore in the first place I do give unto my son, Gascoigne Wild, which is mow my only son living that I had by her all my houses, lands and tenements both free and copyhold situate, lying and being in Braconash, Hempnall , Fordham or in any other town or towns those manors, advowsons as also those any lands and tenements free and copyhold lying in Mulbarton that I lately purchased of George Euston Clarke and also my manor and manors, lordship and lordships of Tasburgh which I purchased of Sir Robert Gaudie and George Gaudie [Gawdy], Esq., also all other my lands and tenements situate, lying and being in the town of Tasburgh aforesaid and with the marsh and meadow grounds I late purchased of Sir Robert [illegible] known or called by the name of Clarke Marsh or by what other name or names whatsoever the same are known or called by as all what is copyhold or freehold to the same belonging as also I give unto him, the said Gascoigne, my lands in Saxlingham and Tasburgh I bought of Mr Marmoll and my capital messuage or tenement with all the lands, tenements and appurtenances as well freehold and copyhold to the same belongings which I late purchased of Henry Elms, gent, and others situate, lying and being in [illegible] and the towns adjoining in the county of Suffolk to have and to hold all the aforesaid manors, messuages, lands, tenements and premises as well freehold and copyhold with all and every their rights, members and appurtenances unto my said son, Gascoigne Weld, and the heirs male of his body begotten or to be begotten. And for default of such issue male lawfully begotten or to be begotten I do give and devise the same unto the right heirs of me the said Mathew Weld forever and who [illegible] in any like kind for the advancement and preferment of Mathew Weld, my eldest son who I had by Katherine [illegible] my first wife, in marriage with Barbara Wicksted daughter of John Wicksted in the town of Cambridge [illegible] I did assure unto him and her and to the heirs male of him, the said Mathew, on the body of the said Barbara begotten lands free and copyhold of good yearly value in Pulham Marie [St Mary] in present possession in the county of Norfolk and did likewise assure and convey other lands and tenements lying in Long Stratton in the said county of Norfolk of the full value of fifty pounds a year on and at the feasts from and immediately after my decease and by conveyance and indentures tripartite between me, the said Mathew Weld, on the one part and the said John Wicksted and others on the second part and the said Mathew Weld, my son, and the said Barbara Wicksted, afterwards wife to my said son, Mathew, on the third part appeareth wherein upon my son, Mathew Weld, and was most fitting and did not only release to me and my heirs such interest and estate wherein I formerly (which was unknown unto him) did make him joint purchaser with and of my manors of Tasburgh in Norfolk which are settled only in rents and royalties but of no [illegible] save of one rightful which said Mathew Weld, my son, now deceased and I still surviving ___ the [illegible]interest now only in myself and my heirs if no former release had been made but also he, the said Mathew Weld, [illegible] unto me a bond of two thousand pounds penalty not to claim afterwards any interest in the said manor nor in any other lands or tenements which I had all remaindings to maintain the residue of my charge as wife, children and family neither should he ever at any time after by my life or after my death claim or challenge any right or interest in any of the other lands, free or copyhold, which I then had or which I should afterwards purchase in my lifetime but that as well those I had then and those I should happen to purchase should go and continue unto my wife and children I now had or should have or that the same should [illegible] to such other son or sons to whom I should in and out of the same by any kind of conveyance or by my last will and testament or otherwise howsoever and that neither by any omission or surrender to [illegible] of my last will or otherwise he or any of his heirs should or might be entitled to any part of my copyhold lands or to a third part of what may be found to be holden either in capital or in rights survivor of the [illegible] to or of any [illegible] but that if any such [illegible] should happen which I know of none but that I pay respite of homage for the manor of Tasburgh only which yet [illegible] on and other the clerks of the court of the exchequer did say that the said manor of Tasburgh is holden in capital in soccage which draws no wardship but respite of homage only [illegible] such omission of surrender should be whereby all or any part of my copyhold lands ought [illegible] the laws of this realm to come or descend to my said son, Mathew, or any of his issue or issues, my grandchildren but upon a reasonable request to him, his heirs or assigns to whom I have by this my last will and testament to him, them or any of them, their heirs or assigns given or bequeathed any lands or tenements in my said last will and testament expressed and mentioned at the to as and charged in the law notwithstanding by him, her or them that shall or may or ought to take benefit thereby shall refuse, release, quit claim and convey, surrender and do any or act or acts whatsoever and by his, her, their or any of their personal claims all shall advise or be advised for the [illegible] and confirms my such intent and purpose to for him, them or any of them of inheritance or otherwise of such lands and tenements as I have devised unto them or any of them according to my true intent and meaning which copyhold lands I am [illegible] part I have besides my gift or them likewise surrendered to the use or uses in my said last will and testament expressed. Item: I give and bequeath unto my grandchild, Wickstead Weld, and to his heirs male of his body lawfully begotten all those my messuages, lands and tenements both free and copyhold situate and being in the town of Wacton in Norfolk by reason they are near unto the lands and tenements which I have already conveyed unto him in Long Stratton upon condition nevertheless that he, his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns shall pay or cause to be paid to one Mr Gouche (if he said true) an apothecary of Norwich the [illegible] about or near six pounds which was for physick his father had in the time of his illness which of he died to be paid within half a year after he shall come into his lands and shall likewise pay unto his two brothers, Martin Weld and John Weld to either of them fifty pounds apiece in form following that is to say at the feast of St Michael the Archangel within one year after his entry then to pay unto his brother, Martin Weld, five and twenty pounds, part of his fifty pounds, and at the next feast of St Michael the Archangel following five and twenty pounds more in full payment of the said fifty pounds and at the two feast days feast of St Michael the Archangel then next and immediately following that Martin shall be paid, to pay unto his other brother, John Weld, five and twenty pounds apaying until the said John Weld be fully paid his legacy of fifty pounds of which several legacies of fifty pounds apiece unto his two brethren if the said Wickstead should fail of payment in such manner as I have appointed in that case my will and meaning is that either of my said grandchildren, Martin Weld or John Weld, shall enter into all the said messuages and lands in Wacton and shall hold and enjoy them to them and their assigns until they and either of them be paid and satisfied their whole sum or sums of fifty pounds apiece for either with all such damages and charges as they or either of them have sustained by not having their several monies as I have given and bequeathed unto them and my meaning and intent is that if either of them do die or depart this life before the said sum or sums shall grow due or payable unto them or either of them that then the survivor of them shall have part or portion of him that shall die or depart this life before it shall have become due or payable; and my meaning is also that if my grandchild, Wickstead Weld, shall happen to die or depart this life without issue male then the said lands and tenements in Wacton with their appurtenances shall descend and go to my son, Gascoigne Weld, and his heirs forever. Item: I do give unto my grandchild, Wickstead Weld, also so in Long Stratton and outlying two acres which I bought of one Dawfrie to have to him and his heirs male as aforesaid and not otherwise. Item: I do give and bequeath unto Mathew Weld, my grandchild, son of my said son, Mathew Weld, all those messuages and tenements and my freehold and copyhold lands lying and being in the town of Gissing in Norfolk to him and his heirs male of the body of my said grandchild, Mathew Weld, upon condition nevertheless that he, his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns shall pay or cause to be paid unto his two brethren, Martin Weld and John Weld, my grandchildren, to either of them the sum of fifty pounds apiece in form following that is to say at the feast of St Michael the Archangel within one year after his entry but my will and meaning is he shall have no interest in those lands and tenements nor in any hereafter by this my will bequeathed unto him until the Michaelmas after he shall accomplish his age of one and twenty years but that my executor shall take the profit of the lands towards the maintenance of my said grandchild and the performance of the legacies in this my will expressed in the [illegible] so as for to pay my grandchild, Martin Weld, five and twenty pounds, part of his fifty pounds, and at the Michaelmas following such to pay unto my grandchild, John Weld, his brother, twenty five pounds in like manner and at the next Michaelmas after to pay to the said, Martin Weld, another five and twenty pounds in full payment of fifty pounds and at Michaelmas after that to pay unto his brother, John Weld, another five and twenty pounds in full payment of his fifty pounds ; if the said Mathew Weld fails of payment unto them in such manner as I have appointed then in that case my will and meaning is that either of my said grandchildren, Martin Weld or John Weld, shall enter into all the said messuages and lands in Wacton and shall hold and enjoy them to them and their assigns until they and either of them be paid and satisfied their whole sum or sums of fifty pounds apiece for either with all such damages and charges as they or either of them have sustained by not having their several monies as I have given and bequeathed unto them; and my meaning and intent is that if either of them do die or depart this life before the said sum or sums shall grow due or payable my meaning is [illegible] shall be paid to my grandchild, Mathew Weld, but it is also my but if my grandchild, Mathew Weld, shall happen to die or depart this life without issue male then the said lands and tenements in Gissing with their appurtenances shall descend and go to my son, Gascoigne Weld, and his heirs forever and for default of such issue the brothers of him, the said Mathew, in seniority one after the other which shall survive shall have and enjoy all the said messuages and lands of them and their heirs male of their bodies lawfully begotten and for such default of issue male the same to remain and be to Mathew Brewster, my grandchild, the son of William Brewster and Anne, his wife, my daughter, and to his heirs male forever and for default of such issue male the same to be to the right heirs of the said Mathew Weld forever. Item: I give and bequeath unto my son, Gascoigne Weld, and his heirs my lands and tenements in Saxlingham in Norfolk which I bought of Jonas Irbells viz: Tavith atte Haye and a [illegible] thereto belonging and one also there [illegible] and a through road and half an acre and I think a five rood acre there near, all in the lands and tenements heretofore or hereafter to be given by this my last will and testament to my grandchild, Wickstead Weld, son of my son, Mathew Weld, and Barbara his wife, shall be but upon condition that is to say that if the heir or heirs of my said son, Mathew Weld, or any of them or the guardian or guardians to any of the heir or heirs of my said son, Mathew Weld, shall not faithfully and honestly do and perform all things in this my will contained or hereunto be mentioned and declared according to my true intent and meaning [illegible] unto my son, Gascoigne Weld, and to his heirs and assigns or to such other person or persons or his or their or any of their heir or heirs or assigns which by this my last will and testament heretofore or hereafter I shall give any manors, lands or tenements unto other free or copyhold all such [illegible] therein or any of [illegible] right interest of or title which he, they or any of his heir or heirs have or may have on and claim to any my manors, lands or tenements as well freehold and copyhold to him, her or them or any of them heretofore or hereafter bequeathed or intended to be given and bequeathed of the copyhold [illegible] lands not with it and to my said son, Gascoigne, I have made surrender to the use of this my last will that if it should happen that if any omission be my full intent and meaning is that the heir or heirs of my son, Mathew, shall [illegible] under and release unto him, her or them their heirs or assigns all such right, title and interest that he or they or any of them shall, may, might or ought to have or claim in so all or any parcel of them which is his or their or any of them shall not perform [illegible] to and perform upon reasonable request to be made by my said son, Gascoigne, or by any other person or persons heretofore or hereafter in this my last will unto whom I have given or hereafter shall give any lands, tenements, either free or copyhold, and to he or their heir and heirs or also by his, her or their heirs or assigns learned counsel shall [illegible] at the [illegible] and charged in the law notwithstanding of my said son, Gascoigne, and such other persons as aforesaid, his heir and heirs or any of their heirs or assigns then I will and my meaning is that neither any of the heir or heirs of my said son, Mathew Weld, that is to say Wickstead Weld, my grandchild, shall have or take any benefit by this my last will and testament but that all my lands and tenements free and copyhold aforesaid heretofore given to my grandchild, Wickstead Weld, shall be only to my son, Gascoigne Weld, and to his heirs forever and that upon such two or five heirs or heir their wilful neglect thereof at all he, they and every of them shall be [illegible] and disbarred of any gift or bequest for offer, legacy or legacies in this my last will and testament I have or shall give unto him, the said Wickstead or his heirs or assigns and that in that case also my said executor or executors shall and may take and have all lawful benefit and advantage against my said son, Mathew, and his heirs, executors and administrators of the bond of two hundred pounds penalty as aforesaid and must earnestly entreat that he or they may have all benefit and favour both in courts of law and court of equity for their relief therein; my will and desire being that they may all live and love together as brother in common and allies as I hopefully will and every one peaceably and quietly to possess and enjoy what out of the Holy blessing of God he hath enabled me to give, confer and bestow upon them. And I do further give and bequeath unto him, the said Wickstead, to be paid by my executor or executors upon the performance of the conditions aforesaid, annexed unto the lands formerly bequeathed unto him and not otherwise, twenty pounds to be paid unto him towards his charges of [illegible] or for his charges in that business that he shall happen so to spend with the [illegible] escheator and other [illegible] attendant [illegible] within one month after he hath settled and quitted those businesses. And I do further give and bequeath unto the said Wickstead Weld, my grandchild, upon such conditions as aforesaid and not otherwise that they may remain with him, my grandchild, as a token of especial remembrance of my love and good will I bear him four very fair apostle spoons, the fellows I gave of two unto him, my godson and grandchild, Wickstead Weld, at his christening, I being then one of his godfathers, which spoons were my son, Mathew Weld's, grandfather's that I leave in amongst [illegible] bought and purchased of my nephew [illegible] my son and Mathew's mother's niece, Emsman, and Allyce. And such of my son Mathew's children by education or otherwise are not fit for other [illegible] I do give and allow toward their [illegible] forth as apprenticed to any good trade or trades ten pounds apiece whereby they may learn to live in some honest [illegible] and calling, not to live idly and unprofitably which is both hateful to God and all good men. And to my brother, John Weld's, sons that may be living or at my death have livings I give unto either or any of them twenty shillings apiece; and to his daughters forty shillings apiece; and to my cousins, John Weld and Henry Weld, my brother, Thomas Weld's, children twenty shillings apiece; and to my cousin, Edmund Weld's, children twenty shillings apiece to be paid by my executor or executors within five months after my decease. And likewise I give unto my man that attends me, [illegible]. .......hand piece [illegible] now to [illegible] to my cousin, Thomas Weld, therefore I put it out in this my will. Item: I do give unto my son Brewster two levies (?) or parcels of ground in Fundenhall that I purchased [illegible] of the lands there of my cousin, Barwick, besides I do not only remit a debt for twenty pounds that he, my said son Brewster, does owe me without fear (?) also so and that he provide such competent portion for my daughter, Anne, his wife, accrued with to a bond of great penalty tending to that purpose which he have entered to me for to enjoy for to [illegible] and of her life for which I have not the least doubt but he will perform the same. And I do further give unto my daughter Brewster a black gown and to Brightmond a black cloak and to her daughter, Elizabeth Brewster, my grandchild forty pounds for and towards help of portion in marriage for her [illegible] and to all other her children living ten pounds apiece, [illegible] to John Brewster, her son, with whom I gave ten pounds in my lifetime when he was put forth an apprentice and a clerk to an attorney; and I do likewise give unto my daughter Norton five pounds, to be paid into her own hand for so and disposed to her own good liking and unto her a black gown; and I do likewise give unto my daughter Howard (?) forty shillings to be paid into her own hands likewise and a black gown; and I do give unto my sister Gascoigne, if she be living after my decease, five pounds to be paid into her own hands, and to all her children that shall be living after my decease to be paid into their mother's hands for them twenty shillings apiece to be paid within one year after my decease. And I do give unto the town of Braconash for a remembrance of my love to all unto their [illegible] stocks the sum of forty shillings which I will have entered into the church books for a common grant and contained thereof and to the poor of the same town to be distributed by my executor twenty shillings and to the poor of the town of Tasburgh twenty shillings and to the poor of the town of Long Stratton twenty shillings and I do give to the poor of the town of Mulbarton twenty shillings. Item: I do give unto my son Gascoigne Weld and to every of his children ten pounds apiece to remain in their father's hands but to be remembered as a legacy given by me unto them and to my son and daughter Brightmond's children four pounds apiece to be left in his hands but to be remembered as a legacy given by me unto them. And where I have any mortgage by house or lands which if I have any they are long forfeited yet if such parties that for mortgaged them or their heirs will truly pay to my executor or executors such sums of money as they were mortgaged for and pay all the rents issuing out of them and consideration reasonable for my long for bears my charges of reparations and all the my parliamentary charges and the like disbursements I am [illegible] they shall have them. And I will my executor or executors to pay especially my debts as I know of none but if any happen to be, of what nature, however that they may be truly paid and my legacies likewise according to my true intent and meaning. And revoking all other and former wills etc... And thereof I do make and ordain Gascoigne Weld, my son, my one executor, give, will and bequeath unto him all my goods, chattels, cattle, plate, jewels, ready money, the privie [illegible] as of bills from committees for disbursements for houses and lay[illegible] forth by their appointment [illegible] and implements of household and whatsoever else do belong to me to the performance of this my last will and testament. And so for my body, without any pomp and pamper, to be decently buried in the church or chancel of Braconash or Tasburgh, where in Tasburgh my late wife and my son, Mathew Weld, were interred or where if it so please God, at the discretion of my executor. And of this my last will and testament I do make and appoint my nephew, Thomas Weld, son of my late brother, Thomas Weld deceased, and Edward Cooke, gent, steward of my manors of Tasburgh, supervisors, entreating them to be aiding and attesting to my said executor for the better performance of this my will and testament for which pains of my cousin (sic), Thomas Weld, and for a token of my love I bear him I do give unto him five pounds and for my friend, Edward Cooke, twenty shillings for his pains therein. And one thing I have forgotten I give unto my uncle Daniel Weld's children (if any be alive) twenty shillings apiece. And to my brother, John Weld's, wife (if she be living) ten shillings for a remembrance of my love. Whereof to the five sheets etc...April third one thousand six hundred fifty. A codicil to be annexed to the last will and testament of me Mathew Weld of Braconash in the county of Norfolk, gent, which I do declare, make and publish to be and is part of the same my last will and testament the first day of November anno dom one thousand five hundred forty nine (sic). Whereas I, the said Mathew Weld, by my deed indented bearing date the nineteenth day of September in the year of our Lord God one thousand five hundred forty and nine and made or mentioned to be made between I, the said Mathew Weld, of the one part and John Weld of Wicklewood in the county of Norfolk, gent, and of Roger Lawes of Wymondham in the aforesaid county of Norfolk, gent, on the other part for the consideration therein expressed have for my [illegible], my heirs and assigns covenanted and granted so to and each of them, the said John Weld and Roger Lawes, their heirs, executors and administrators and every of them that if the said Mathew Weld my heir and assigns and every of them from thereto and at all times afterwards should and would stand and be seized of and in the manor and manors, lordship and lordships of Tasburgh, Asphall cum Boylands and Hunts situate, lying and being in the said county of Norfolk with all the royalties, liberties, franchises, casualties (?), profits, hereditaments and appurtenances whatsoever to the said manor and manors, lordship and lordships belonging and appertaining and allow of and in all those charged lands, tenements and hereditaments whatsoever of me, the said Mathew Weld, situate, lying and being in Brakonash, [illegible] and Mulbarton in the said county of Norfolk and in every or any of them and which are in the aforesaid deeds indented particularly mentioned and expressed with all and singular the rights, members and appurtenances whatsoever to them or any of them in anywise belonging or appertaining and also of and in all the messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments whatsoever of me, the said Mathew Weld, situate, lying and being in Rumburgh , Wissett and South Elmham in the county of Suffolk with their and every of their rights, members and appurtenants whatsoever except the messuages lands and tenements in [illegible] in the said county of Norfolk which I, the said Mathew Weld, purchased of James [illegible] behoof of myself and my assigns for and during the [illegible] of my natural life without impeachment of or for any manner of waste and from and after my decease then to the [illegible] and behoof of Gascoigne Weld only son of me, the said Mathew Weld, now living and the heirs male of his body lawfully begotten or be lawfully begotten and for default of such heirs male of his body begotten or to be begotten to the use and behoof of the right heirs of me, the said Mathew Weld, forever. And of and in the messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments in Saxlingham aforesaid which I purchased of the said Jonas Irbells with the appurtenances to the use and behoof of my self and my assigns for and during the term of my natural life without impeachment of or for any manner of waste and immediately from and after my decease to the use and behoof of him, the said Gascoigne Weld, my son and of his heirs and assigns forever are in and by the said mentioned deed indented [illegible] being thereunto had it, doth or may move at large [illegible] now, I, the said Mathew Weld, do by this my last will and testament and codicil annexed thereunto ratify and confirm the said mentioned deed indented and all and every the use and uses, estate and estates therein and thereby and by force of the statute for the transferring of uses into possession created, varied by [illegible] or appointed and everything therein contained. And I, the said Mathew Weld, do hereby further declare the said deed indented to be real and true to all such uses, behoofs, intents and purposes as are therein contained [illegible] and without any trust or confidence in and or [illegible] whatsoever and therefore for the better [illegible] and estatage of the said manors and lordships, messuages, lands, tenements, hereditaments and other [illegible] accordingly in the said conveyance shall in anywise or in anything prove defective or insufficient in the laws for any matter or can [illegible] I do hereby will, devise and appoint all and singular the said manors, lordships, messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments whatsoever mentioned and expressed in the said deed indented with their and every of their rights, members and appurtenances whatsoever except the said messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments in Saxlingham aforesaid which I purchased of the said Jonas Irbells immediately from and after my decease to my said son, Gascoigne Weld, and the heirs male of his body begotten or to be begotten and for default of such heirs male to the use and behoof of the right heirs of me, the said Mathew Weld, forever. And the said messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments in Saxlingham aforesaid which I purchased of the said Jonas Irbells I do hereby will and devise, bequeath, limit and appoint immediately from and after my decease to my said son, Gascoigne Weld, and his heirs and assigns forever. Proved at London 22 May 1552 (sic).

Tuesday, 29 January 2013

Norfolk Welds

A large part of my family tree consists of the Welds of Dorset and Shropshire primarily but they pop up in other locales as well - who descend from Sir Humphrey Weld and Ann Wheler/Wheeler.

His line is probably worthy of an entry but he will have to wait.

I recently, whilst researching the Dayrell family of Lillingston Dayrell and Cambridgeshire, came across the Welds of Bracon Ash in Norfolk and have spent an inordinate amount of time trying, to no avail, to establish a link between the Dorset and Shropshire line (firmly established) and these Welds of Norfolk.

The first find was in A Topographical History of the County of Norfolk: There was a good estate here [Bracon Ash] purchased by John Weld in 1618, and much added to it in 1620, by Mat Weld. All this family are interred in the south aisle. Alderman Edward Weld, who died in 1746, and is buried at Cawston in Norfolk, was of this family (See vol. iii. p. 451.) [I have yet to make a connection].

 The rest of the entry reads:

Gascoigne Weld, Esq. died 25 Apr. 1701, 84. Judith and Anna Weld Infantes. A.M.P.

M.S. Depositum Matthei Weld Generosi, qui plenus Annorum obijt 6 tJ . Jan. An° X' 1 1650, cum vixisset annos 83, Mens. 6, Septiman. un: Gascoignus Weld, Filius unicus bene merenti gemens posuit.


Weld, arg. a fess nebule between three crescents er. impaling Gascoign, arg. on a pale sab. a luce's head erected and cooped or, being the arms of Eliz. his wife, daughter of Gascoign of Illington.
(See vol. i. p. 449).


Joseph Weld, son and heir of Gascoign Weld, aet. 13, A. 1664, was alive and lived here. Eliz. his sister lies buried here with the arms of Rutter; three garbs in chief a lion passant arg. impaling Weld.


Here lieth the body of Eliz. Rutter widow, late the Wife of Richard Rutter Esq; of Kingsley in Cheshire, who was daughter of Gascoigne Weld late of Braconash Esq. who departed this Life the
4th of Dec. 1714, aet. 69. The Remains of Philip the wife of Gascoigne Weld Esq; Daughter of Phillip Calthorp Esq; Aug. 4, 1704,.

72. Barbara Weld ob. set. 18, 1690.


Using this I found Mathew Weld's will, d. cir 1652, and transcribed it and found he was first married to Katherine illegible by whom he had Mathew, who predeceased him in 1650 and was buried in Tasburgh, Norfolk.

The younger Mathew married Barbara Wicksted and they had issue: Wickstead m1 Elizabeth Smith m2 Ann Pyches, John m unknown with issue, Amy, Martin, Mathew m Jane Dey and Barbara.

Mathew senior remarried to Elizabeth Gascoyne, presumably following his first wife's death and had with her: Gascoigne Weld m1 Philippa Calthorpe and m2 Ann Hall, Mary m William Starkey, Elizabeth m Richard Rutter, Judith, Anna and Joseph d. 1712.

In his will Mathew senior mentions his uncle Daniel (which is problematic in terms of linking to the aforesaid family line since the only extant Daniel in the tree doesn't fit).

As well as his surviving children and grandchildren the elder Mathew mentions cousins Thomas Weld, Edmund Weld and, as aforesaid, his uncle Daniel. He bequeaths lands and tenements in Bracon Ash, Tasburgh, Hempnall, Fordham, Mulbarton, Saxlingham, Pulham Marie, Long Stratton, Wacton, Gissing and Fundenhall in Norfolk along with Rumburgh, Wissett and South Elmham in Suffolk.

Trying to link the Norfolk Welds with the main line I went back to William de Welde d. 1352 who had issue, William his heir - whose line produces the established families - and two younger sons who settled in Bucks and Suffolk but nothing more appears to be known of these two younger sons. I've spent untold internet hours trying to find the son who settled in Suffolk but with no success.

Skip a few generations to John Weld who died in circa 1588. He was a citizen and haberdasher of London and nephew of the aforementioned Humphrey and married Dorothy Greswold who had three surviving children: John m Elizabeth Romney; Joan m Humphrey Slaney; Dorothy m Sir William Whitmore - as an aside the Slaneys and Whitmores were very intertwined with the Welds - she remarried to Hugh Offley and her monument lists her children and doesn't mention a Daniel.

Their son John married Elizabeth Romney viz:

Sir William Romney. Son-in-law of Robert Taylor (Alderman, Sheriff 1592–3). His elder daughter married John Weld, Town Clerk of London (nephew of Sir Humphrey Weld, Lord Mayor 1608–9).

UPDATE: in view of the information recently found [see bottom of the page] I think this should read great nephew.

He is a possible candidate for the John Weld who purchased 'a good estate' in Bracon Ash in 1618 but I have no conclusive evidence to link the two.

Two further snippets mention both the Welds and the Berneys:

Tho. Garneys died lord of a moiety [of Loddon, Norfolk] in the 9th of Elizabeth, leaving Elizabeth his daughter and heir, aged 11 years; she married Philip Strettey [Strelley?], Esq. of Nottinghamshire, and by their deed, dated November 2, ao. 17 of Elizabeth [1575], sold it to John Weld of London, haberdasher; and Sir Thomas Gresham, conveyed the other moiety, which he bought of Thomas Glemham, Esq. January 14, ao. 5 of Elizabeth, to the said John Weld, on April 22, ao. 23d Elizabeth [1581], so that Weld was lord of the whole manor.

John Weld, Esq. in the 18th
[sic] of Elizabeth, sold it to Elizabeth, late wife of Richard Berney, Esq. who leased it to Anthony Hobart of Hales Hall, Esq. for 60 years at 60l. per ann.

And from A General History of the County of Norfolk:

BRACON ASH (or Broken Ash). Six miles. St. _____ .

P. 260. Bracon Ash, Braccas, Braccles, or Brakcne, signifies the broad Leas. - Leas was part of the possession of Roger Bigod, at the conquest; one part he gave to Olf the Dane, who joined it to Flordon manor. It came afterwards to the Peverels, and from them passed through several branches to the Woods and the Welds, &c. When sir Hugh Peverel was patron, a gild was held in the church. The present church is thirty-six yards by sixteen; and August 28th, 1808, it being thoroughly repaired, was opened; the lord bishop of Norwich attended on the occasion; and afterwards, with many of the neighbouring clergy, dined with T. T. Berney, esq. of Bracon hall: and on the 22nd of June of the following year, a new altar-piece was placed in the chancel; it was executed by Coppin, of St. Stephen's Norwich; at the same time the king's arms was placed in the body of the church; on this occasion the bishop of Norwich preached. The bell hangs in a turret. In the chancel windows are the arms of the East Angles and of England. Here are inscriptions to the memory of the Woodes, Peyton, Hall, Weld, and Bedingfield. At Bracon Ash is the seat of Mrs. Berney.


Apart from the following entries in British History Online the Norfolk Welds seem to have disappeared from history (although I know Wickstead Weld relocated to Moulton in Suffolk and that Gascoigne's son, Joseph, was an MP for Bury St Edmunds and died unmarried in 1712):

6 April, Jas. I, 1605.

Newton Flotman - Bargain and sale by Thomas Richardson, Esq, of Norwich, to Matthew Welde of Acle, gentleman, of two inclosures of land containing together four acres and a half in Newton Flotman and Mulbertone.

26 July, 19th Jas. I., 1621.

Tasburgh - Bargain and sale by Sir Robert Gawdye of Claxton, Knt., and George Gawdy, Esq, of Norwich, to Matthewe Welde of Brakenashe, gentleman, and Matthewe Weld, his son and heir-apparent, of the manor or lordship of Tasburghe alias Taysburghe, with the liberties, land, tenements, &c.; parcels of the said manor in Tasburgh, Fritton, Hempnall, Stratton alias Stretton, Shelton, and Morneng Thorpe.

20 Dec, 8th Chas. I., 1632.

Attleburgh. - Grant by Rowland Rowse, son and heir of Robert Rowse, late of Kirbie, now of Atleborough, husbandman, to Matthew Weld of Brakenashe, gentleman, of a messuage builded, and five pieces of land in Atleborough.


11 Jan, 12th Chas. I, 1637

Wymondham. - Bargain and sale by Thomas Howes of Wramplingham, yeoman, son and heir of Thomas Howes of North Tuddenham, deceased, to Thomas Weld of Wymondham, gentleman, of the reversion of thirteen acres and one rood of land, &c.; and other lands, tenements, &c., in Wymondham.


Admissions to Grays Inn: Thomas Weld, son and heir app. of Thos. W., of Wymondham.

1654 - For this and the following Parliament Norfolk returned ten members, viz.: Sir John Hobart, Bart., Blickling; Sir William Doyley, Shottisham ; Sir Ralph Hare, Bart., Stow Bardolph; Thomas Weld, Esq., Braconash; Robert Wilton, Esq., Wilby; Thomas Sotherton, Esq., Taverham; Phillip Wodehouse, Esq., Kimberley; Robert Wood, Esq., Braconash; Philip Bedingfield, Esq., Ditchingham; Tobias Frere, Esq., Bedinghall.

Farm near Earsham Common containing c. 55 acres. Feoffment: Thomas Fritton to Thomas Weld, 1638. copy of will and codicil of Thomas Weld, 1650 and 1660; mortgaged by Edmund Weld to John Chappell, 1693; released by Thomas Weld to Chappell, 1702; lease and release.


For now how the Norfolk Welds fit into the wider family remains a mystery.

Update [08.12.15]: Have found this from An Essay Towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk -

KIRKEHALL MOYNES And GURNEY'S [in Rockland All Saints], were distinct manors at first, though they have been long united; in 1589, John Welde of London was lord; in 1590, Humphry Welde, Gent, executor of the said John, kept his first court; and in 1601, John Weld of London, Esq. was lord and patron; in 1623, William Welde had them; in 1639, Sir Robert Berney, Bart, was owner in whose family they continued till.....1695.

Rockland All Saints is just under 15 miles from Bracon Ash and so the last mentioned John Weld, who has to be the John married to Elizabeth Romney, looks increasingly like a credible candidate; if I could just find his will!

At some point I'm going to have to do a tour of the mentioned villages to see what remains of these Welds but for now I'm fairly sure I've got a match.

Update [17/02/16]: The Norfolk/Suffolk Welds are definitely connected to the Shropshire/Dorset clan as both families arms are A fesse nebule between three crescents erm (don't ask me what that means) and both have a Wyvern, in various forms, as their crest.

Also John Weld married to Elizabeth Romney can be struck out as a candidate since he would have been 10 when John of Norfolk's first dated child was born.

I'm currently transcribing Dame Mary Weld's (nee Slaney 1560 - 1623, Sir Humphrey's 2nd wife) will in the hope of a lead and will post it when done - so far it's pretty turgid  and I'm only on page 5 of document 1 of 4!

Update [16/03/16] Dame Mary's will has proved to be pretty much illegible through foxing and poor scanning, and illegible writing, so that's a dead end for now.

However  a new Suffolk connection has arisen viz Humphrey and Anne's ?eldest daughter, Joan (1579-1618) married Sir Robert Brooke (1573-1646) of Cockfield Hall, Yoxford, Suffolk which is in the vicinity of the later Norfolk Welds' holdings.

Friday, 18 January 2013

Upshire, Essex

St Thomas is a deeply uninspiring building made worse by failing light.

ST THOMAS. 1902 by Freeman & Ogilvy. - PLATE. Cup and Cover of  1782; Paten bought in Armenia; Almsdish with repoussé representation of Adam and Eve, probably Flemish.

St Thomas (2)

Mee didn't bother.

Abridge, Essex

I thought I'd found Holy Trinity but in fact photographed the Evangelical church which is an altogether different beast. I must have gone straight straight past it without noticing.

UPDATE: passed through Abridge the other day and recorded Holy Trinity - yay,

HOLY TRINITY. Small uninteresting brick church of 1833, enlarged by R. W. Edis in 1877.

Quite a pretty village centre along the main road, with one half-timbered, gabled house, and (in a good position facing the traveller, as he  approaches from the E) the Early Victorian BLUE BOAR. It has quoins and a Tuscan porch.


Evangelical Church
Evangelical Church

Holy Trinity
Holy Trinity

Mee doesn't mention it.

Noak Hill, Essex

I am definitely getting soft in the head. Built in 1841-2 St Thomas should not be my cup of tea at all but I really rather liked it. I wish I'd got inside as Mee makes it sound interesting, rather to my surprise.

ST THOMAS. 1841-2 by Blore. Red brick, with transepts. Octagonal SW turret. The main windows with transomes. Not in a style usual in the 40s.

St Thomas (2)

NOAK HILL. It looks across at the trees in Pyrgo Park, where kings and queens came to stay, and we come to it for a few treasures in its 19th century church, wood and glass about 300 years old, mostly brought here from the Continent. Both in wood and in glass there are strikingly vivid pictures of the Crucifixion by old craftsmen. The one in wood is on the chancel wall, and also shows Christ bearing the Cross. It is sombre and perhaps a little grotesque, but full of quaint realism, and is said to come from a monastery at Florence. The other is in the east window, an intensely realistic scene with Our Lord between the two thieves, the Madonna and three other Marys, John, two horsemen, and soldiers holding the spear and sponge. The window also has full-length figures of Peter and John the Baptist, and a group of the Madonna with Zacharias and Elizabeth. In other windows are French , heraldic medallions of the 16th century, panels of Saul with Doeg the Edomite, The Agony in the Garden, The Scourging, and Doubting Thomas. We see also the badge of Jane Seymour, with a bird springing from flowers set in a round tower, and two medallions with the heraldry of Anne Boleyn. All this old colour the church has to brighten it, and it glows too with the yivid hues of coats-of-arms in all the nave windows.

Little Warley, Essex

St Peter was an unscheduled visit but as I passed it on my way to Noak Hill I stopped. This pretty church both architecturally and location wise sits besides the busy A127 and is kept locked with no keyholder listed (to be fair there's nowhere to list a keyholder as there's no noticeboard).

Sadly someone had smashed the south east chancel window, presumably in an attempt to gain access, which provides a point for both sides of the argument but, given that it was patently obvious there was nothing worth stealing here, if the church was unlocked the someone wouldn't have smashed the window.

It's worth noting that a search on Flickr shows that when Whipper_snapper visited in Jan 2007 someone had smashed the same window

It has some interesting monuments locked inside.

ST PETER. A small church. Brick W tower of 1718 with chequer pattern, diagonal buttresses and parapet. C15 stone nave with some windows with Perp tracery. Early C16 brick chancel, heavily buttressed (later) on the N side. The E wall is early C19. S porch of timber c. 1500. Nave roof with tie-beams and king-posts. - BOX-PEWS, C17. - PLATE. Cup of 1564 with band of ornament. - MONUMENTS. Brass with demi-figure of Anne Terrell d. 1592. - Sir Denner Strutt and his wife d. 1641. Standing wall monument. Recumbent effigies on shelves, the wife behind and above the husband. Big baldacchino and coarsely carved putti lifting up the curtains. - Lady Strutt d. 1658. Standing wall monument. Semi-reclining figure in a shroud; cheek propped on elbow. - Father Time, early C17 alabaster figure, reclining, from a lost monument.

St Peter

Vandals

Sir Denner Strutt 1641 (2)

LITTLE WARLEY. The woods about it rise and fall with the hills, and a row of pretty cottages lines the edge of a breezy common from which are fine views, while the old church stands by the hall on the arterial road to Southend. Built entirely of brick in the 16th century, the hall has great charm, especially the side facing the church, with black bricks making a rich pattern and a two-storeyed porch with a crow stepped gable. Rising above the high pitched roof are twin chimney shafts with spirals. The small church is a patchwork of materials, a 16th century chancel and 18th century tower of brick having been added to a nave of grey and white stone. We come in by a 15th century door, and are charmed with two cherubs holding back a canopy over the striking tomb of Sir Denner Strutt, who lies in armour below the figure of his first wife, with his second wife close by. Sir Denner sat in the first Parliament of Charles Stuart. On the wall is the brass portrait of a lady in Elizabethan dress, wife in turn to Davye Hamner and John Terrell. In a niche is a quaint alabaster figure of Father Time.

Ramsden Crays, Essex

Hidden away at the end of a single track lane St Mary is a redundant church converted into a domestic property.

ST MARY. 1871 except for the belfry, with broach spire. It stands on four posts with heavy braces from N to S. The building of 1871 makes use of some C15 windows.

St Mary (1) 

Mee missed it.

Ramsden Bellhouse, Essex

St Mary the Virgin - locked no keyholder.

ST MARY. 1880, except for the  S porch and the belfry. The porch may be as early as the C14, with coarse timbers. Braces from the doorway. The belfry stands on four posts with heavy braces from N to S. Weatherboarded aisles on N, S, and W. Original C15 timber doorway. The spire is hipped. The roofs of chancel and nave are also C15 or early C16. - FONT COVER, c. 1700. - CHEST. Heavily iron-bound, 7 ft long. - CHAIRS. Three in chancel, thickly carved, early C18. - PLATE. Cup with bands of ornament, 1562, and Paten of the same period.

St Mary the Virgin (3)

RAMSDEN BELLHOUSE. Its name comes from the Bellhus family, but it might well have come from the 15th century wooden tower and spire of the church, an example of the astonishing timberwork for which Essex is famous. It is almost the only part of the church not rebuilt, and for over four centuries has kept its huge beams inside, its oak doorway carved with a rose and a shield, its door with hinges older still, and its belfry steps with their unshaped treads. The nave roof is just as old, and a beam in the chancel is enriched with twisted foliage. From the 14th century are the rafters and bargeboards of the porch and a beautiful little piscina arch with tiny quatrefoils in the spandrels. There are three chairs elaborately carved in the 17th century, when the graceful cover was made for the 15th century font; and there is a big medieval chest six feet long, the lid so heavy that it is in two parts each with two handles.

God’s Acre charms us here with a cluster of elms higher than the weathercock, and standing in their shade we have a lovely view over rolling meadowland. Under a gravestone carved with an hour glass lies one whom we may perhaps call the most remarkable child in the village, Anthony Child who died an old man in 1726. He had lived under seven rulers, six kings and Oliver Cromwell, and missed the eighth only by a year.

Runwell, Essex

I had high hopes for St Mary as there appeared to be no reason for it not to be open but sadly it was locked.

ST MARY. The best thing about the church is the two porches, timber structures of the 15. The side openings are arched and cusped. Over the gateway is a king-post. The main difference between N and S is that the one has quatrefoils, the other trefoils in the spandrels of the arches. W tower with diagonal buttresses, battlements and a recessed spire. Higher stair turret. Nave and chancel (lengthened in 1907) in one. Double Hagioscope. S arcade of four bays with short circular piers and double-chamfered arches - the only reminder of the C13 in a church otherwise entirely Perp. - SCREEN. By W. F. Unsworth, 1909. - POOR-BOX. Oak, hollowed-out, iron-bound. - PLATE. Cup with band of ornament, and Paten, both of 1562. - MONUMENT. Brasses of Eustace Sulyard d. 1547 and wife d. 1587. Kneeling figures between pilasters carrying a pediment. - Mr Gunnis also mentions a signed tablet to Edward Sulyard, 1692, by Thomas Cartwright, jun.

St Mary (3)

RUNWELL. It stands on the low hills near the River Crouch. Its church tower is 15th century but the round columns of the arcades are from a church which was a place of pilgrimage in Thomas Becket’s day. The timbering of the porches is enriched with Tudor roses, and the name of one of the benefactors, John Talbot, is on a beam. One of the doors is original, hinges and all, and on the inside is a curious burnt mark looking as if it had been made by a red-hot hand; the old folk will tell you that it is the mark of the devil’s hand when he was shut in the church by an ancient priest. On the chancel walls are brasses of Eustace Sulyard and his wife in rufif, facing each other over a prayer desk, and there are other monuments to the Sulyards, the last of the line being Sir Edmund, who was buried here in 1692. They lived at Fleming’s, a farm with a lovely Elizabethan wing still standing. There is a poor-box hollowed out from a block of oak, yellow flowers in medieval glass, and a scratch sundial saved from the earlier church. In a chapel is a vividly coloured oak statue of the Madonna.

Nevendon, Essex

I mistook St Peter for a Victorian built church but it is in fact old.

ST PETER. Small. Nave with two C14 doorways, chancel with some renewed C13 lancets. Roofs C15. Belfry resting on tie-beams instead of posts.

St Peter (1)

NEVENDON. It keeps its peace a little apart from the great Southend road. At a bend in the lane we come to its ancient church, with the lychgate between two friendly barns, the vicarage garden next door, all charming with pines and chestnuts and limes. A little wooden bell turret sits on the nave, which is 600 years old and has had faces watching by its doors all the time. The chancel with its lancet windows is a century older, and the roofs were looking down on the worshippers when Columbus was sailing the Atlantic. The modern pulpit and panelling take their place with a quiet charm; but out of place when we called seemed a big shell-case (though engraved with the names of those who fought in the Great War).

North Benfleet, Essex

All Saints looked more promising - farmyard position, duckpond and an old church - but sadly it has been abandoned and is in danger of collapse (part of the tower is fenced off) and is woefully neglected. It's not the worst I've seen but give it a few more years and it will be a shell; to me it's a shame the CCT hasn't taken control even though Pevsner is somewhat dismissive:

ALL SAINTS. Away from the village but close to the moated site of North Benfleet Hall which was recently pulled down. The church is small and of little interest outside, except for one early C16 brick window of two lights with panel tracery. The brick tower of 1903 does not betray the timber construction of the belfry inside, with braces between the posts from E to W as well as from N to S. Trellis-struts higher up. and this heavy timbering in its turn does not betray a window of c. 1200 hidden in the Norman W wall of the nave. - FONT. Of the C13 Purbeck type, square bowl, each side with six shallow blank pointed arches.- PLATE. Cup of 1506 with a band of ornament; Cover of 1564.

All Saints (2)

John Cole 1836 A soldier of Waterloo

NORTH BENFLEET. Here stands a farmhouse of ancient wonder and delight, one of its wings having survived, roof timbers and all, from the 15th century. The middle block and another wing were made new in the 16th century, and the entrance door has big strap-hinges and many an interesting detail of Stuart times. A great pond, all that is left of its moat, lies between it and a crowd of barns and haystacks. By them is the church, with a few of its original stones still seen, though in the west wall behind the massive timbering is a round-headed window of 1200, now blocked outside by a modern tower. The font is 13th century, the two bells are 15th, and the communion cup, with a band of engraved ornament, was first used in the spacious days of Queen Elizabeth. At the entrance to the 16th century porch is a tombstone with this curious inscription:

Sacred to the memory of John Cole, a soldier of Waterloo.
At the celebrated command, Up Guards and at ’em, he was wounded
by a musket ball but heroically persevered till the victory. He died
in this parish April 10, 1836, aged 51, bequeathing his medal to
the curate, whose last act was the erection of this tablet.

Thursday, 17 January 2013

Daws Heath, Essex

Well this is a first - today I did a finishing off run of the outer reaches of the south eastern quadrant covering village churches from near Southend on Sea, past Basildon, up to Brentwood and finishing near Epping before heading home. Similar to last week my expectations were low but I was amazed to find that all of the ten churches visited were locked with no keyholder listed - on no other trip have I found all the churches so uninviting and I will save my comments for Little Warley a little later down the line.

Understandably St Michael & All Saints was missed by Pevsner & Mee for the simple fact that it didn't exist in their day; a ski chalet building, I made a mistake including it on a visit.

St Michael & All Saints (2)

Tuesday, 15 January 2013

Steeple, Essex

St Lawrence & All Saints was my last planned visit of the day, although I was going home via Woodham Walter to see the glass I'd missed previously, and was another disappointment being a locked rather ugly Victorian built church.

ST LAURENCE. 1884. Nave and chancel, belfry. In the late E.E. style with cusped lancets. The remarkable thing is that the architect, F. Chancellor, who built the church, using materials of the preceding medieval church, has indulged in an orgy of mixing into his brown stone walls bricks entirely at random and in all directions. Even the window dressings are not completely of brick, but use the brick intermittently without any principle but that of variety. Inside, the W end is divided off by a circular pier into two bays.
STANESGATE PRIORY. The priory was Cluniac, founded probably early in the C12. Of all that the Royal Commission could still describe in 1923, only one wall remains now visible.

St Lawrence & All Saints (2)

Arthur missed it.

Mayland, Essex

St Barnabas is a template Victorian built lego construct in a beautiful setting which replaced an older church which became seriously dilapidated and was demolished.

ST BARNABAS. 1867 by the younger Hardwick (GR). Nave and chancel only. E.E. with cusped lancets and a bellcote on the E gable of the nave, an unusual motif. Tall S porch. - PLATE. Paten of 1568; Cup with two bands of ornament, probably of the same date.

St Barnabas (2)

Once again Mee ignored it.

Flickr.

Monday, 14 January 2013

Latchingdon, Essex

There are two churches of Latchingdon, St Michael, which is redundant and now a private residence, and Christ Church which seems to be teetering on the edge of redundancy (although that might be judging a parish by its cover) and which did not imbue me with a desire to gain access - actually I wanted to get out of the area ASAP.

ST MICHAEL. Just the nave and a S porch. In the N wall a four-light brick Window of 1618, still with the lights ending in four-centred arches. At the W end a four-post structure for a belfry which has disappeared.

Christ Church, 1857 by St Aubyn (GR).

St Michael (2)
St Michael

Christ Church (2)
Christ Church
Another one Mee missed.

Purleigh, Essex

All Saints, on the face of it, looked to be the highlight of the day - the exterior, apart from an ill conceived and poorly designed meeting room, promised so much but inside was a disappointment despite a good pulpit, some OK Nicholson glass and the repositioned Moses and Aaron reredos portraits (a first for me which led to some research and new understanding) this all a bit underwhelming.

ALL SAINTS. Ambitious embattled W tower with angle buttresses with three set-offs, bands of flint and stone, and also some flint and stone chequerwork. The windows indicate a C14 date. Restored in 1892 with American money, in memory of Lawrence Washington, rector from 1632 to 1643. Brick S porch with a four-centred doorhead and two-light W and E windows. Early C14 chancel, see the intersected and cusped three-light E window and the similar two-light N and S windows, also the Sedilia and Piscina, where however ogee arches occur at the tops of the cusping. Nave arcades with thick short octagonal piers and double-chamfered arches. Those of the S arcade die against the vertical continuation of the piers. - PULPIT. Elegant piece of c. 1700; staircase with twisted balusters, nicely framed panels and garlands hanging down the angles. - COMMUNION RAIL. Early C18? The balusters not twisted, but no longer of C17 forms. - REREDOS. 1758. Now dismantled. The large paintings of Moses and Aaron by one I. Fairchild. -  CHANDELIER. Brass; given in 1758. - STAINED GLASS. Early C14 tabernacles in the heads of the chancel N and S windows. Later C14 tabernacles in a S aisle window. - PLATE. Fine set of c. 1760 with gadroon ornament.

Pulpit

East window - AK Nicholson (6)

Aaron reredos

PURLEIGH. It is a hilltop village to which Americans come, for here preached Lawrence Washington, the great-great-grand-father of the Father of the United States for ten years, he was thrust out of Purleigh in 1643, and his son John sailed for Virginia in 1657. The 14th century church he knew is a handsome place and has been carefully restored by American friends in memory of the Washingtons. We found a portrait of George Washington and his mother hanging on the walls.

The tower is made beautiful by bands of knapped fiints, and little flint crosses ornament the buttresses. Both tower and chancel have bands of 14th century bricks with glazed surfaces, rare examples of early brickwork. The bricks in the porch are Tudor, and the porch shelters a door with iron strap-hinges which has been opening and shutting for 600 years. All this time a leopard has been looking down  from one of the windows, shining in the sunlight of 600 summers. A modern window has the portrait of John Wycliffe, and two great oil paintings of Moses and Aaron hang on the walls. The pulpit was made in Queen Anne’s reign, and one of the preachers, Provost Hawkins, preached from it for 55 years last century.

Stow Marie, Essex

SS Mary & Margaret is an astonishing building - part original flint and rubble wall augmented by, what I took to be, Tudor brickwork; it seems to have collapsed and then been repaired in the C16th retaining those bits that were sound.

There's not a huge amount of interest here but it's a lovely building and open, which probably added a huge plus to the draw, and the alter paintings, Mary Browne brass and Della Robbia memorial are all lovely; so whilst probably not a top ten of Essex certainly in contention for best of the day and looking at the west end photo certainly best in show.

I think Pevsner's rather harsh: ST MARY AND ST MARGARET. Chancel taller than the nave. The nave is C15 (see the N window of three lights with panel tracery) but was heightened in brick early in the c 16 to which the trefoil-arched corbel frieze and the stepped E gable belong. - BRASS. Mary Browne d. 1602, nothing special.

SS mary & margaret (3)

Altar1 - I am Gabriel who stands before God

Mary Browne nee Cammocke 1602 (4)

STOW MARIES. It is a small place on the low hills above the Crouch, with a lovely God’s Acre of trees and roses. A vivid red cross glows from the wooden bell-turret of the 15th century church, in contrast with the soft red corbel table crowning the nave wall below. Angels are playing viols in the headstops of the windows. There is a medieval niche in the wall now filled by a saint.

In the chancel is a brass portrait of Mary Browne, a village lady of the days of Queen Elizabeth, with little portraits of her three sons and four daughters. The stately wooden reredos dominating the sanctuary is a peace memorial and has three paintings of three Annunciations: the Annunciation of the coming of John to Zacharias, the Annunciation by Gabriel to the Madonna, and the Angel’s Annunciation to the women at the Tomb that Christ was risen. They are charming in their silvery colouring, and the setting is helped by the absence of a window in the  background. The font is 15th century.

Althorne, Essex

St Andrew is an imposing building with a large tower, squat nave and short chancel and is simply stunning and locked, however keyholders are listed but were out when I called. St Andrew felt like it had more to offer inside and I left feeling profoundly disappointed.

UPDATE 20/08/15: Had to make a delivery just up the road today and stopped off on my way home and the keyholder was in. Very disappointing inside as it has been thoroughly airbrushed and there is little of interest. I saw no sign of the brass and thought Pevsner very harsh on the font - I thought it rather good of its kind.

ST ANDREW. Nave, chancel, and W tower - all Perp. The W tower is of flint and stone and has diagonal buttresses. The battlements have a trellis pattern of ashlar against the flint ground. Above the W door is an inscription which reads as follows: ‘Orate pro animabus dominorum Iohannis Wylson et Iohannis Hyll quorum animabus propicietur dens amen.’ They no doubt paid for the building of the tower. The nave is of flint, embattled, the chancel lower and of brick. - FONT. Octagonal, Perp, with fleurons on the foot, panel tracery on the stern, and on the bowl figures of angels, saints, a baptism, the martyrdom of St Andrew, etc. The figure carving is thoroughly bad. - BRASS to William Hyklott d. 1508 ‘which paide for the werkemanship of the wall of this churche’.

St Andrew (3)

ALTHORNE. Charming here it is to see the white-sailed boats coming up the wide estuary with the flowing tide, and delightful to come to the church by the grassy lane. In the church is a gem which should draw every traveller this way - a font exquisitely carved about the year 1400, recording for all time the costume worn by kings and queens and ordinary people of that age. The panels of the bowl are cut deep to throw the figures in strong relief. Here is a seraph feathered from crown to foot, and stately withal; here is a royal prince at a font with a priest baptising him; in another panel stands a king with his queen beside him, plucking at her gown as if to curtsy.

The church is 14th century, the tower 15th, its embattled parapet enriched with flints in a trelliswork of stone giving it great beauty. On a nave buttress is a medieval scratch dial. An inscription below a portrait brass tells us that this is William Hyklott, who paid for the wall of the church; he is with two daughters, one dressed as a nun, and engraved with them are a delightful Madonna and Child.

Flickr.